The partial lunar eclipse on 2019 July 16th

In 2019, observers were treated to two lunar eclipses.  The eclipse on January 21st was a total one, though it meant getting up before dawn to see it, at the coldest part of the year! Hence it would be mainly diehard enthusiasts that made the effort to see the first of the two.

The eclipse on July 16th was  partial, with the Moon passing through the southern sector of the Earth’s shadow cone, with the maximum phase occurring at 21h 32m UT, when 65% of the Moon lay in the umbral shadow.

The fact that the Moon was quite far south in the sky, and that for UK observers the Moon would hence be not far from the south east horizon when already in eclipse, would allow for some good imaging opportunities, with terrestrial foreground objects besides the eclipsed Moon.

I took a series of images not far from the village of Barton in North Yorkshire where I live, but also with a smartphone camera held to the eyepiece of my 120mm refractor at home. This shows that useful images can be taken with relatively modest equipment.

David Graham took this handheld smartphone image of the eclipse at 21h 26m UT. The Moon was about in greatest eclipse at that time.

 

The eclipsed Moon at 22h 07m UT. Handheld smartphone camera image at the eyepiece of a 120mm refractor, exposed to show earthshine, by David Graham.

 

The eclipsed Moon at 23h 03m UT. Handheld smartphone camera image at the eyepiece of a 120mm refractor, by David Graham.

 

The eclipsed Moon at 22h 17m UT. Handheld smartphone image at the eyepiece of a 120mm refractor, by David Graham.

 

The eclipsed Moon at 22h 30m UT. Handheld smartphone camera image at the eyepiece of a 120mm refractor, by David Graham.