It ain't necessarily so ...

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brian livesey
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It ain't necessarily so ...

Post by brian livesey »

In his nice little book, "Deep Sky Oberver's Guide" ( Phillips ), Neil Bone says that the Ring Nebula isn't visible in binoculars, but is it true? Well, a couple of evenings ago I set up to prove him wrong for the second time, but with x5 more magnification than the first time some years ago.
I mounted the 25x70 Skymaster's ( these bins are stopped down to 63mm at the prisms ) on the homemade binocular mirror mount and aimed at Lyra. The sky was cloud free, but quite humid, so that Albireo in Cygnus was barely visible with the unaided eye.
I slowly panned the mirror through Lyra, with the aid of a laser pen attached to the binocular, and there it was, the tiny, grey, disc of the nebula. Years ago, I searched for the Ring Nebula with 20x60 Russian Tento's and the nebula was unmistakable, in a sky less light polluted than it is now. The two observations show that not every claim made by an author is necessarily so. One thing that could not be discerned in the binoculars used was the Ring Nebula's annulus.
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Cliff
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Re: It ain't necessarily so ...

Post by Cliff »

Brian
First I don't recall ever seeing Neil Bones book myself & it is a few years since I observed the Ring Nebula.
I can only say/guess that when people talk in broad terms about observing using binoculars they are generally referring to 10x50s or 8x30s.
If an observer uses such binoculars, then perhaps (?) they are unlikely to see Ring Nebula as a ring - only as an faint elliptical blob.
So in a smallish observing guide book I think I can accept Neil's comment.
from Cliff
brian livesey
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Re: It ain't necessarily so ...

Post by brian livesey »

I've spotted the Ring Nebula in 10x50's Cliff, but it was very faint and almost starlike. In his book, "Astronomy with Binoculars", ( Faber ), James Muirden claimed that M33 is difficult in binoculars. I saw it well overhead one exceptionally clear evening in 8x40 bins ( these were very bright bins, I wish I'd kept them! ) and mistook it for a cloud. It didn't move at all and after checking a sky map, saw that it was the spiral galaxy.
In "stargazing with Binoculars", (Phillip's ),co-authored by Robin Scagell and David Frydman, we are told that the North American Nebula is very difficult in binoculars. Again, it depends on sky clarity. I saw it and its neighbour, the Pelican Nebula, quite easily one evening in the 8x40's.
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jeff.stevens
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Re: It ain't necessarily so ...

Post by jeff.stevens »

This took me back a bit, and reminded me of a thread from a long time ago:

https://popastro.com/forum/viewtopic.p ... 0cdc#p4665

I haven’t observed M57 for a long time, so thanks for triggering my interest, Brian. I might dust off my 25x100.

Best wishes, Jeff.
brian livesey
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Re: It ain't necessarily so ...

Post by brian livesey »

Tell us what you see Jeff. :wink:
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michael feist
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Re: It ain't necessarily so ...

Post by michael feist »

25x70 [ or 25x63 stopped down] is big for a binocular, especially when considering the times past, presumably when Mr Bone wrote his book. I have picked it out in something like a 70mm spotting scope, but as a small fuzzy spot, but no central hole. I will give it a go with my 15x65 Acuter spotter. regards mike [the watcher]... Currently watching torrential rain beating against the window-pane!
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Re: It ain't necessarily so ...

Post by michael feist »

And to add, M33 I have found easily in anything including very small handheld instruments given good transparency, but not unaided-eye. Does look quite large and cloudlike with indistinct edging in 15x70 spotter given good transparency. regards mike...rain has stopped!
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Re: It ain't necessarily so ...

Post by michael feist »

This morning 26th September MMXX 0035-O120 BST the sky was very clear and Moon had set. After looking at URANUS and MIRA, I turned the Hawke 8x42 monocular and Acuter 15x65 onto M33 in the south. As a fuzzy patch in smaller instrument and a good clear obvious blob in the large. Did attempt to look at M57 RING nebula but now in west and only visible from road-facing window so unsuccessful. regards mike [the watcher]
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