Search found 5463 matches

by brian livesey
Wed Oct 28, 2020 7:10 am
Forum: Gallery
Topic: NGC 457 The Owl cluster
Replies: 1
Views: 8

Re: NGC 457 The Owl cluster

The cluster looks very pretty in the 25X70 binoculars. It's an old favourite. Thanks Ian for calling it the Owl and not the ET cluster. The colours are well shown in your image. Cassiopeia is rich in binocular star fields and clusters.
by brian livesey
Tue Oct 27, 2020 5:08 pm
Forum: Gallery
Topic: Messier 51
Replies: 4
Views: 52

Re: Messier 51

In 1953 at the age of twelve, I entered the school library and saw a little astronomy book on the shelf with the enchanting title of "The Star Spangled Sky". The book was authored by a vicar and for the general reader. The book had a number of black and white plates and one of them turned me on to a...
by brian livesey
Mon Oct 26, 2020 6:06 pm
Forum: Space exploration
Topic: NASA Will Announce an 'Exciting New Discovery About The Moon' on Monday
Replies: 2
Views: 28

Re: NASA Will Announce an 'Exciting New Discovery About The Moon' on Monday

It looks like the discovery turns out to be that there's more water on the moon than was previously thought. This is according to a news item on the BBC TV this afternoon. Apparently, the discovery will make it easier to establish a base on the moon and also provide a source of hydrogen as rocket fu...
by brian livesey
Mon Oct 26, 2020 5:58 pm
Forum: Observing
Topic: Mystery streak on Mars
Replies: 5
Views: 44

Re: Mystery streak on Mars

Oops, you're right Brian, Sorry about that! :roll:
by brian livesey
Mon Oct 26, 2020 5:28 pm
Forum: Observing
Topic: Mystery streak on Mars
Replies: 5
Views: 44

Re: Mystery streak on Mars

Maximillian used his 355mm Newtonian and Baader RGB filters AS1290mm to make his visual discovery of the streak Nigel. Seeing was 6-7/10.
by brian livesey
Sun Oct 25, 2020 2:32 pm
Forum: Observing
Topic: Mystery streak on Mars
Replies: 5
Views: 44

Mystery streak on Mars

A dark streak has appeared near Arsia Mons and is telescopically visible. See today's www.spaceweather.com
by brian livesey
Fri Oct 23, 2020 8:09 pm
Forum: Visual Satellite Observing
Topic: ISS springs a leak
Replies: 2
Views: 437

Re: ISS springs a leak

The trio in their Soyuz-M16 capsule landed on the steppe in Kazakhstan yesterday. A couple of years ago, Tim Peake's Soyuz capsule was on display at Manchester's Museum of Science and Industry. The capsule was badly displayed. It stood vertically, so the public could only seen a little of the inner ...
by brian livesey
Wed Oct 21, 2020 10:18 am
Forum: Observing
Topic: observing from bed
Replies: 33
Views: 897

Re: observing from bed

Just to say Nigel, that you could go down a couple more notches in magnification on the 4-incher. From the sources I've read, the lowest magnification with a scope is 4D. That's to say four times the diameter of the aperture in inches. This would be 16X for a 4-incher.
by brian livesey
Wed Oct 21, 2020 10:01 am
Forum: Space exploration
Topic: Osiris-REx has landed
Replies: 1
Views: 26

Osiris-REx has landed

To the delight of NASA controllers, it's asteroid probe to asteroid Bennu, launched in 2018, has landed on the stony body and attempted to take a surface sample of 60g.. If the first sampling is too small, there's enough fuel to make two more attempts.
by brian livesey
Tue Oct 20, 2020 8:26 pm
Forum: Gallery
Topic: The SUN - 20th October
Replies: 3
Views: 21

Re: The SUN - 20th October

Dammit Cliff, I missed today's prom. I was tempted to look through the PST this afternoon, but at the last minute decided not to. It was one of those days where the Sun popped in and out of passing cloud. I almost always find on days like today that by the time I get to the eyepiece, the Sun disappe...
by brian livesey
Mon Oct 19, 2020 8:59 pm
Forum: Observing
Topic: observing from bed
Replies: 33
Views: 897

Re: observing from bed

Yes Nigel, a 4-inch/f.5 refractor makes a good richest field 'scope. Ideal for the Orion Nebula the Perseus double-cluster and M31 in Andromeda, etc. :D
by brian livesey
Mon Oct 19, 2020 12:41 pm
Forum: General chat
Topic: books
Replies: 3
Views: 46

Re: books

You might like to consider Phillips Colour Star Atlas. The maps are very attractive and give the physical types of many stars. There's also plenty of interesting text for an atlas. I wouldn't like to part with mine. :D
by brian livesey
Mon Oct 19, 2020 12:06 pm
Forum: Observing
Topic: observing from bed
Replies: 33
Views: 897

Re: observing from bed

How's your 4-inch/f.5 refractor for chromatism Nigel? I have the same spec, but a Celestron. The chromatism is pretty strong on higher powers. I bought a Baader semi-apo filter to deal with it, but I reckon that it's only about 30 per cent effective. It also reduces some of the incoming light, in co...
by brian livesey
Sun Oct 18, 2020 5:11 pm
Forum: Gallery
Topic: Messier 13
Replies: 6
Views: 86

Re: Messier 13

A thousand apologies Ian for mistaking your image for a Smerral one!
by brian livesey
Sun Oct 18, 2020 11:17 am
Forum: Astrophysics
Topic: How an ice age begins and ends
Replies: 0
Views: 30

How an ice age begins and ends

A recent theory of how the ice age began challenges the theory of Milankovitch cycles, by saying that gases released by volcanic activity, dissolving rocks in mountain sutures, cooled the atmosphere. Now, a new theory complements the first by explaining how the last ice age ended. It's been known fo...