The Moon Guide
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U. S. N. O.
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The phase of the Moon right now

Phase
 
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First quarter Moon Credit Robin Scagell/Galaxy
First quarter Moon


Moonwatch Weeks








We organise Moonwatch weeks from time to time when the Moon is in a good position to be observed going through its range of phases, starting with a crescent just after sunset and ending just a couple of days before full Moon, and is easy to observe in the early evening after school.

You might think that the best time to observe the Moon would be when it's full, because there's more visible, but actually it's much more fun to look at it when the shadow line (called the terminator, but nothing to do with those movies!) is visible. Then, you can see the craters and mountains much more clearly because of the shadows they throw across the surface, while at full Moon all you see is different shades of brightness – much more boring.

What can we see on the Moon?
The last Moonwatch week was held in November 2010, and we've left the pages in place as the same details apply during most months at some time. There, you'll find details of the major features visible on the Moon on that date. You can see the features we mention with even a small telescope, such as the 60 mm telescope distributed to nearly 1000 schools during the International Year of Astronomy, 2009.



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Mare Crisium
Mare Crisium

MoonWatch evenings

10–11 November 2010

12 November 2010

13 November 2010

14 November 2010

15 November 2010

16 November 2010

17 November 2010

18 November 2010

Jupiter Watch 2010
 
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International Year of AstronomySociety for Popular AstronomySociety for Popular Astronomy